The Only Three Ways To Be More Productive

I’ve met plenty of people who have “five years of marketing experience” that can’t market as well as someone who has worked in marketing for six months but read the fundamental books of the field.

At the end of the day or week, make a list of your least valuable tasks and ask: “Is it profitable?” If not, stop doing it. If yes, can you delegate it?

From https://taylorpearson.me/3productivity/

Hack into your flow

“The average business person spends less than 5% of their day in flow. If you could increase that to 15%, overall workplace productivity would double,”

“The brain can’t tell the difference between physical consequences and emotional risk,” says Kotler. “Taking social risks is the same as physical risks.”

“In Silicon Valley, the idea is to fail fast or fail forward,” he says. “If you’re not giving employees space to fail, you’re not giving them space to risk. Move fast and break things. Engage in rapid experimentation. High consequences will drive flow and you get further faster.”

From https://www.fastcompany.com/3031052/how-to-hack-into-your-flow-state-and-quintuple-your-productivity

How many hours do we really need to work?

…​ a study that found managers couldn’t tell which of their employees worked 80 hours per week and who just pretended to work 80 hours. So if you’re overworking in the hopes of impressing your boss and landing a raise or a promotion, you may be wasting your time.

Studies have shown that working more hours increases your productivity only to a point. That point seems to be around 49 hours. So if you’re working 60-, 70-, or 80-hour weeks, it’s very unlikely your output is actually much more than you’d get done in a 50-hour week.

From http://blog.rescuetime.com/2017/05/09/how-many-hours-should-we-work

Imposter syndrome

Story from author Neil Gaiman:

Some years ago, I was lucky enough invited to a gathering of great and good people: artists and scientists, writers and discoverers of things. And I felt that at any moment they would realise that I didn’t qualify to be there, among these people who had really done things.

On my second or third night there, I was standing at the back of the hall, while a musical entertainment happened, and I started talking to a very nice, polite, elderly gentleman about several things, including our shared first name. And then he pointed to the hall of people, and said words to the effect of, “I just look at all these people, and I think, what the heck am I doing here? They’ve made amazing things. I just went where I was sent.”

And I said, “Yes. But you were the first man on the moon. I think that counts for something.”

And I felt a bit better. Because if Neil Armstrong felt like an imposter, maybe everyone did. Maybe there weren’t any grown-ups, only people who had worked hard and also got lucky and were slightly out of their depth, all of us doing the best job we could, which is all we can really hope for.

From https://zapier.com/blog/what-is-imposter-syndrome/

A step from my morning ritual

I decided to share a step from my morning ritual. Maybe someone gets inspired 🙂

The step is “opening all bookmarks from daily folder”ss_2017-08-31-06-32-43

When I get tired or annoyed by something a just remove it or I wanna learn about something new I just add it to the channels to occupy my mind with stuff that I care about, want to learn more about.

For example the Free learning site will not be long in the list.

 

Honesty by Ben Horowitz

​How is it possible that everybody believes that they are honest yet has a difficult time identifying anyone else with the same characteristics? Are we all so dishonest that we are lying to ourselves?

If I trust you completely, then I require no explanation or communication of your actions whatsoever, because I know that whatever you are doing is in my best interests. On the other hand, if I don’t trust you at all, then no amount of talking, explaining or reasoning will have any effect on me, because I do not trust that you are telling me the truth.

From https://a16z.com/2017/07/27/how-to-tell-the-truth/

Communication is oxygen

Love this quote

​I will never stop learning. I won’t just work on things that are assigned to me. I know there’s no such thing as a status quo. I will build our business sustainably through passionate and loyal customers. I will never pass up an opportunity to help out a colleague, and I’ll remember the days before I knew everything. I am more motivated by impact than money, and I know that Open Source is one of the most powerful ideas of our generation. I will communicate as much as possible, because it’s the oxygen of a distributed company. I am in a marathon, not a sprint, and no matter how far away the goal is, the only way to get there is by putting one foot in front of another every day. Given time, there is no problem that’s insurmountable.

Source https://watirmelon.blog/2016/07/22/how-we-communicate-at-automattic/

Difficult decisions

1. Think in Years, Not Days

Thee most successful people, Banfield found, “are intensely future-oriented. They think about the future most of the time,” rather than thinking only of the next few hours or even minutes

2. Understand the Effects of Decision Fatigue

3. Cut down on the number of decisions you have to make each day

4. Consider the Opposite

5. Stay away from the ‘What if’ game

The bottom line of decision making involves determining which potential decision will offer the best possible outcome based on what we know now.

Good decisions don’t ensure success but bad ones almost always ensure failure.

From https://zapier.com/blog/difficult-decisions/

Practice being your future self

​A question I hear a lot is: What about all the things I actually need to get done? Don’t I need to get through my cluttered email box, my pressing conversations, my project plans in order to create space to focus on my future self?

Nope.

That’s a trick your busy self plays on you to keep you away from the scary stuff you’re not yet good at and that isn’t yet productive. Sometimes you need to be irresponsible with your current challenges in order to make real progress on your future self.

From https://hbr.org/2016/03/you-need-to-practice-being-your-future-self